Our Gut is our Second Brain – Here is a full guide

Our health depends in part on the well-being of our belly, especially our gut. Containing millions of neurons, this complex organ is in constant communication with our brain. It seizes up, and our whole body suffers. So here we are going to discuss how our gut is our second brain.

Summary

  1. We underestimate the role of the gut
  2. A sensitive and intelligent organ
  3. Two-way communication with the main brain
  4. The belly, involved in the triggering of certain diseases
  5. A new track for Parkinson’s disease

We do not generally consider the intestine as a noble organ … Error! First, this large tube, whose unfolded surface is equivalent to a football field, ensures our nutrition, vital function. Above all, recent discoveries show that it plays a role in the onset of diseases such as obesity, immune deficiencies, sleep disorders, etc. The researchers’ initial work gives hope for a new way of treating them.

We underestimate the role of the gut

If the intestine seems responsible for so many “ills”, the reason is simple: it alone constitutes a real mini-organism, composed of the same elements as the other organs (epithelial, muscle, immune, nervous cells, etc.).

Better still, our digestive tract is partly directed by a “second brain”, the enteric nervous system (SNE), which perceives and transmits our emotions to the belly.

A sensitive and intelligent organ

Like the “first”, the “second brain” is made up of neurons that communicate with each other through chemical messengers.

“The information is provided by neuromediators, chemicals present in the enteric nervous system (SNE), which would be released, for example, in the event of distension of the intestine”, explains experts. Our intestine would be endowed with “sensitivity”, a memory, even a certain intelligence!

Two-way communication with the main brain

“This digestive brain, which in part ensures the control of the main digestive functions, is capable of acting alone, but would also be in permanent communication with our main brain”, explains experts.

A complex two-way brain-gut relationship ensured by the nervous system’s stress (sympathetic) and rest (parasympathetic) neurons. An explanation for the fact that annoyance gives stomach aches…

The belly, involved in the triggering of certain diseases

The intestine also plays a defense role in the body. Teamwork involving cells specialized in immunity and hundreds of billions of bacteria (or intestinal flora).

Finally, the fragile “skin” of the intestine would act as a barrier, allowing the necessary substances to pass through and blocking pathogenic or toxic agents.

A set of complex mechanisms controlled by the digestive brain and which intrigues researchers, because our belly could well be involved in the triggering of many diseases.

A new track for Parkinson’s disease

A link between the two brains could thus exist in the development of Parkinson’s disease. “Studies carried out in parallel on the level of the brain and the digestive tract have shown in certain patients digestive lesions identical to those of the brain. This suggests that the digestive tract could be a gateway to the disease, but this remains a hypothesis “, notes experts.

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